Welcome to the IMPROVAC® News.

Here you will find the latest news, views and information about Zoetis revolutionary boar taint vaccine - IMPROVAC.

  1. Experience with IMPROVAC as a Producer and Vet in Australia - Pig International
  2. Swiss launch means that Boar Taint Vaccine is now licensed in 63 Countries
  3. The new look pork industry, John Deen article
  4. IMPROVAC - the Mexican experience
  5. IMPROVAC development
  6. EMA approves Zoetis vaccine against boar taint

 

Media Contact

If you are a journalist or news media professional who would like to know more about IMPROVAC, please contact:

Elinore White
Zoetis Director Global Communications
US +1.973.401.4044
Elinore.Y.White@zoetis.com

Find out more at our Zoetis Web Site: http://www.Zoetis.com.

Key Facts and Figures

Pig vaccination around the world

IMPROVAC, the vaccine against boar taint, was developed in Australia and is produced by Zoetis. The most extensive experience so far with the use of vaccination against boar taint is in Australia and New Zealand. Since 1998, vaccination has been used successfully in these two countries under the brand name IMPROVAC. Because of its history of proven performance, this vaccine has been licensed for use in many countries around the world.

Castration

Traditionally, castration of male piglets has been the preferred method of combating taint, with an estimated 95% of the world’s male pig population castrated.

Physical castration has a number of inherent drawbacks – all of which make it less than ideal from a commercial point of view.

The process itself is time consuming and labour-intensive for the farmer, and carries the risk of infection and hernia which at best will require treatment and set the pig back, and at worst will contribute to mortality.

While physical castration may control the cause of boar taint, castrated animals exhibit a less efficient feed conversion rate than a boar. The alternative, slaughtering male pigs before they mature sexually, also means that producers miss out on the rapid growth of the finishing phase.

The reduction in feed conversion associated with physical castration means that animals consume more feed and produce more waste than natural boars for the same weight of meat produced – making production less sustainable and less environmentally friendly.

Finally, physical castration has attracted increasing attention from those who question its suitability on animal welfare grounds.

Consumer taste-test data

Consumers agree vaccination is the preferred method for controlling boar taint. In fact, consumers in Australia and New Zealand have enjoyed pork from vaccinated boars since 1998.3

Research from European and Asian countries during 2004 to 2008 revealed positive consumer reactions to the concept of vaccination as an alternative to castration. In fact, 61-77% of consumers in the countries prefer the vaccination approach compared to castration.3,14

In addition, consumer taste panels are unable to distinguish any differences in the eating quality of pork from boars vaccinated against boar taint – in terms of smell, taste, juiciness and tenderness – and pork from pigs which have been physically castrated or from female pigs.15-19

IMPROVAC Licensing

IMPROVAC is presently licensed in 63 countries around the world, the most recent launch being in the Canada.

Countries presently licensed include:
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Guatemala
Honduras
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malaysia
Malta
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Norway
Panama
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Uruguay
USA
Venezuela
Vietnam

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